Home » Bulgarian People of Armenian Descent: Bulgarian Armenians, Samuel of Bulgaria, Sylvie Vartan, Ivan Vladislav of Bulgaria, Manuela Maleeva by Source Wikipedia
Bulgarian People of Armenian Descent: Bulgarian Armenians, Samuel of Bulgaria, Sylvie Vartan, Ivan Vladislav of Bulgaria, Manuela Maleeva Source Wikipedia

Bulgarian People of Armenian Descent: Bulgarian Armenians, Samuel of Bulgaria, Sylvie Vartan, Ivan Vladislav of Bulgaria, Manuela Maleeva

Source Wikipedia

Published August 19th 2011
ISBN : 9781233109166
Paperback
26 pages
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Bulgarian Armenians, Samuel of Bulgaria, Sylvie Vartan, Ivan Vladislav of Bulgaria, Manuela Maleeva,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Bulgarian Armenians, Samuel of Bulgaria, Sylvie Vartan, Ivan Vladislav of Bulgaria, Manuela Maleeva, Michael Arlen, Magdalena Maleeva, Katerina Maleeva, Armenians in Bulgaria, Theodora Kosara of Bulgaria, Steven Derounian, Artin Poturlyan, Manuc Bei, Gavril Radomir of Bulgaria, Alice Panikian, Aron, Artine Artinian, David, Armen Nazarian, Armen Ambartsumyan, Eduard Eranosyan, Moses, Norair Nurikyan, Armand Tokatyan, Krikor Azaryan, Miroslava of Bulgaria, Kirkor Kirkorov, Emma Tahmizian. Excerpt: Samuel (also Samuil, representing Bulgarian: , pronounced ) was the Emperor (Tsar) of the First Bulgarian Empire from 997 to 6 October 1014. From 980 to 997, he was a general under Roman I of Bulgaria, the second surviving son of Emperor Peter I of Bulgaria, and co-ruled with him, as Roman bestowed upon him the command of the army and the effective royal authority. As Samuel struggled to preserve his countrys independence from the Byzantine Empire, his rule was characterized by constant warfare against the Byzantines and their equally ambitious ruler Basil II. In his early years Samuel managed to inflict several major defeats on the Byzantines and to launch offensive campaigns into their territory. In the late 10th century, the Bulgarian armies conquered the Serb principality of Duklja and led campaigns against the Kingdoms of Croatia and Hungary. But from 1001, he was forced mainly to defend the Empire against the superior Byzantine armies. Samuel died of a heart attack on 6 October 1014, two months after the catastrophic battle of Kleidion, and Bulgaria was fully subjugated by Basil II four years later, ending the five decades-long Byzantine-Bulgarian conflict. Samuel was considered invincible in power and unsurpassable in strength. Similar comments were made even in Constantinople, where John Kyriotes Geometres penned ...